Three of Michael Oluronbi's victims had multiple pregnancies and his wife Juliana arranged abortions.
Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children
Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children
  • 2020-01-14 14:00:05 1 months ago
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A church pastor repeatedly raped children, telling them abuse during "spiritual baths" would ward off evil.

Michael Oluronbi targeted seven victims over 20 years, telling some they would fail exams or become a witch if his advances were refused.

Four girls became pregnant and his wife Juliana Oluronbi assisted him by arranging abortions - with one girl estimating she had five or six.

A Birmingham Crown Court jury convicted the couple of numerous charges.

Oluronbi, 60, who also worked as a pharmacist, "had such a hold over the congregation that anything he said was taken as read," said police.

One of the victims told the BBC the pastor's actions had been "terrible" and "affected everyone's lives".

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said those abused "fell under the benign influence and authority the defendants held, and honestly believed their actions were on God's behalf".

The abuse of one boy and six girls started when they were children - one as young as eight, and for some, continued in to adulthood.

It began after Oluronbi set up a splinter group to the Cherubim and Seraphim Church at a private home in Birmingham.

"Spiritual baths" would take place in an upstairs bathroom, a pretext for sexual abuse ranging from indecent assault during "washing" to rapes afterwards, the court heard.

Oluronbi, of Orchard Drive, Longbridge, Birmingham, was convicted of 15 rape charges, seven indecent assaults and two sexual assaults.

His wife, aged 58, of Walker Road, Walsall, was found guilty of three charges of aiding and abetting rape.

The jury, which found Oluronbi not guilty of one rape and an attempted rape, could not reach a verdict on six charges.

The CPS announced today it would not be seeking a retrial, meaning the Oluronbis' crimes can now be reported.

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Michael Oluronbi: Birmingham pastor guilty of raping children

Britain bans betting on credit cards to fight gambling addiction

Britain bans betting on credit cards to fight gambling addiction

Britain’s 24 million gamblers will no longer be able to use credit cards to place bets under the latest move by the government to tackle problem gambling.

Less than a year after Britain slashed the maximum stake that can be placed on popular fixed-odds betting terminals, it said on Tuesday it would ban gamblers from using credit cards to bet online or offline to rack up debt.

According to trade body UK Finance, around 800,000 Britons use credit cards to gamble. The Gambling Commission believes a quarter of those are problem gamblers – people who are addicted to gambling to try and win back their losses.

Shares of betting companies including 888 Holdings, Flutter Entertainment and William Hill dropped in early trading, before recovering by late morning.

Culture Minister Helen Whately said there was clear evidence of harm from consumers betting with money they don’t have.

“We will not hesitate to take any further action necessary to protect people from gambling harm,” she said in a statement.

Britain has a thriving gambling industry. It employs more than 100,000 people and made 14.4 billion pounds ($18.7 billion) after paying out winnings in the 2018-2019 financial year.

But the government has sought to tighten rules in recent years by capping the maximum stake on terminals, bringing in tighter age and identity checks for online gambling and expanding support for those who become addicted.

The new ban will come into effect on April 14 and apply to all online and offline gambling products apart from over-the-counter lottery tickets.

Davy Research analysts said the ban would likely lead to a low single digit percentage drop in related revenues.

“The latest in a recent series of more onerous regulatory changes, it also acts as a further reminder that the UK opportunity is no longer what it once was,” it said in a note to clients. “However, it remains a very large, (still) growing and highly cash generative market for online gaming operators.”

Britons had a total of 72.1 billion pounds outstanding on credit cards in November, according to Bank of England data, down a little from a record 72.9 billion pounds struck in May.

The post Britain bans betting on credit cards to fight gambling addiction appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Theatre issues allergy warning over peanuts on stage

Theatre issues allergy warning over peanuts on stage

A theatre has issued an allergy warning ahead of its staging of a play which features peanuts throughout.

Moonlight and Magnolias tells the story of three men locked in a room and forced to rewrite Gone With The Wind with only peanuts and bananas to eat.

It is due to open at Nottingham Playhouse on 21 February.

The venue said its prop department was able to create fake bananas but not peanuts due to their texture, size and the need for them to break up.

'Hit by stray peanut'

The theatre's chief executive Stephanie Sirr said: "Moonlight and Magnolias is a very fast-paced and physical comedy and, yes, peanuts may fly around.

"Being hit by a stray peanut is funny if you don't have an allergy and a problem if you do.

"In common with airlines, schools and most other public-facing companies, we'd prefer to err on the side of caution."

A notice on the theatre's website advises anyone with a severe peanut allergy to contact the box office.

Allergy charity Anaphylaxis Campaign said the potential risks were low but commended the venue for its caution.

A spokesperson said: "It is quite difficult for peanut proteins to become airborne, so unless the nuts are being thrown into the audience, or being crushed, cooked or processed in some way so as to release peanut dust into the atmosphere, the risk of an audience member suffering an allergic reaction is likely to be low.

"However, there are a small number of people who tell us that they react to the smell of peanuts.

"Issuing a prior warning will help those individuals to make an informed decision about any risk posed prior to purchasing tickets.

"We would advise issuing prior warning of any food used in a performance, including nuts and bananas, as there are many foods that can cause a reaction."

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