A total of 453 organ transplantations took place in the country last year, reported the national broadcaster Yle, quoting the Finnish Kidney and Live
2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations
2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations
  • 2020-01-14 08:35:10 1 months ago
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Photo Mika Lappalainen/Boy Hulden/ City of Helsinki.

A total of 453 organ transplantations took place in the country last year, reported the national broadcaster Yle, quoting the Finnish Kidney and Liver Association.

The number of organ transplantations exceeded the previous record made in 2016 by more than 50.

The organs donated last year saved lives of 450 people, while 570 more people are on the queue for their turn.

The most common transplanted organ was kidney, numbering 293, followed by liver (64), heart (30), and lung (27).

There were 39 pancreatic transplants, too, which were mostly carried out in combination with kidney transplants, said the Yle report.

A total of 141 donors donated organs in the country last year.

One donor can save the lives of up to six people, said the report, quoting the Kidney and Liver Association.

The organ transplantation operations took place at the Helsinki University Central Hospital (HYKS) using organs collected at central hospitals across the country.

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2019 sees record 453 organ transplantations

Farming profitability grows 8% in 2018

Farming profitability grows 8% in 2018

File picture of Barley grain. Photo VisitFinland.

The average entrepreneurial income of agricultural and horticultural enterprises increased approximately eight per cent in 2018, which is EUR 17,500 per year, according to the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke).

In total, the entrepreneurial income of Finnish agricultural and horticultural enterprises grew from EUR 516 million to EUR 529 million, said a Luke press release on Monday.

The profitability ratio grew from 0.40 to 0.42. The profitability remains modest, which is also shown by the negative 1.6 per cent return on capital invested.

“In 2018, the return of agricultural and horticultural enterprises increased three per cent, to EUR 160,900, due to the growth of farm sizes, among other reasons. On the other hand, costs grew 2.56 per cent to EUR 185,200. Therefore, the difference of revenue and costs keeps the total loss roughly the same as before, EUR 24,400. The sales revenue and/or subsidies should have been that much higher or the costs should have been that much lower to reach a zero result,” said Arto Latukka, a senior scientist in charge of Luke’s profitability bookkeeping.

With the costs of entrepreneur families’ personal labour and equity excluded, the average annual entrepreneurial income per enterprise was approximately EUR 17,500. Entrepreneurial income grew approximately eight per cent from 2017.

According to Latukka, the EUR 17,500 entrepreneurial income is enough to provide the entrepreneur family’s equity an interest of 1.5 per cent, and the compensation per working hour is EUR 6.70, including add-on costs. The profitability ratio 0.42 shows that compensation was 42 per cent of the target level of 3.69 per cent interest on equity and EUR 16 compensation per entrepreneur working hour. The level of hourly rate is based on what an agricultural worker is paid, including add-on costs.

In 2008, the profitability ratios of cereal farms and other crop farms grew to 0.40, sheep farms to 0.27, greenhouse enterprises to 0.96 and poultry farms to 1.12. The small-size sample may be a reason for the annual fluctuation in profitability ratios of poultry farms. The profitability ratios of dairy and other cattle farms decreased to 0.36 and 0.39 respectively and of pig farms to 0.62. On average, the profitability ratio of agricultural and horticultural enterprises increased from 0.40 to 0.42 in 2018. Current prognoses expect the profitability of 2019 to fall back to the starting level.

Tuesday’s papers: Minimum wage, southern Finland's non-winter and gorging on ice cream

Tuesday’s papers: Minimum wage, southern Finland's non-winter and gorging on ice cream

Finland is not keen on EU plans to introduce a minimum wage across the bloc. The EU Commission launches its minimum wage proposal for consultation on Tuesday.

Neither the blue-collar union umbrella group SAK nor Finland’s largest employers’ association, the Confederation of Finnish Industries (EK), warmed to the idea, telling Helsingin Sanomat it would undermine the country's system of collective bargaining between trade unions and employers.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said the move aims to help workers lacking union support.

"We have to think about the people who don’t enjoy the protection of collective agreements," she said.

Several EU states have minimum wage laws, whereas Finland doesn't have a nationally-appointed minimum wage. Instead, the country has practiced collective bargaining since the 1970s, whereby employers and trade unions regularly negotiate wage agreements on the national and industry-specific level.

For a deeper dive into the inner workings of the Finnish labour market, check out our latest podcast which aims to demystify some of the practices associated with collective bargaining in Finland.

No skiing, no sledding

Hufvudstadsbladet says there’s no real winter in sight for southern Finland. The Swedish-language daily reports that long-term forecasts predict mild and wet weather will continue through February and March.

The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) said it expects February temperatures to be 2-3 degrees Celsius above long-term averages.

"There’s always some uncertainty when it comes to long-term prognoses, but the European models are usually the most reliable. An American weather model suggested even higher average temperatures in February—four degrees above average in the south and two to three up north," Mika Rantanen from the Finnish Meteorological Institute told HBL.

A room with a…freezer

Each year, the average person in Finland eats over 12 litres of ice cream.

Inspired by Finns’ love affair with the stuff, HBL reports that a Helsinki hotel’s idea to stock one room's freezer with 12 litres of the milky treat was a roaring success.

The all-you-can eat 'sweet suite' sold out in hours, according to downtown hotel Klaus K.

The hotel told HBL that most guests left an empty freezer at check-out time.